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This Saturday’s UFC 190 will see two undefeated gladiators in Ronda Rousey and Bethe Correia finally square off. And Ronda says her lifetime of Judo study means this fight will be a walk in Rio.

This Saturday UFC Women’s Bantamweight champion Ronda Rousey fights her greatest threat to date from Bethe Correia as they fight on the challenger’s turf.

Rousey said Correia crossed the line in the pre-fight build-up when she apparently made fun of her father’s suicide.

Bethe was quoted as saying: ““I hope she doesn’t commit suicide [after I beat her].”

Ronda, whose father killed himself when she was eight, said: “Suicide is no joke or selling point. My father will be with me the day I hand you the comeuppance you deserve.”

Bethe back-tracked as she Tweeted: “Never knew what happened to ur dad.I’m humble enough to ask u for forgiveness. Family is a godly bless to me. See u in #UFC190.”

In a closed press conference Ronda this week, Ronda made it clear she hasn’t forgotten these comments.

She said: “I think everything up until the suicide comment could have been understandable from a marketing point of view. But when she said that is when it really crossed the line and became truly personal for me.”

The champion has promised to prolong her opponent’s beating.

She said: “If it goes any longer, it’s just because I’m punishing her more. I’m not going to purposely not finish her if I see something. But I will drag it out.”

But she admitted her mom, a former Judo champion has “chewed her out” over this plan and wants her to finish the fight quickly.

Rousey’s record is 11-0 MMA, 5-0 UFC. Beth’s record is 9-0 MMA, 3-0 UFC.

“I’ve overcome so much more than any of these girls possibly ever could. I’ve had thousands and thousands and thousands of matches and so much more competition experience that these girls could ever have. I’ve had fights where I’ve had my elbow dislocated and had to pop it back in place and ended up throwing the other person in the last few seconds with the arm that was just dislocated. I’ve been as sick as possible and ended up throwing up in the middle of the match where I had to wipe it up with my own arm under me. If the referees didn’t see it and I wouldn’t get disqualified. And I still came up and smelling of vomit, I f***ing won anyway.”

She reflected on her childhood Judo study saying: “It’s not like I walked into a gym one day with, you know, I was – like my boyfriend was a fighter and I decided to give it a try. You know this is like my life. I spent my whole life doing this.

And like I was just telling a story the other day, when I was like I think 12 years old my Judo coach (Justin), me and him were being coached by his dad. And we were at this training camp and we had to pull ourselves across the mat. I think we had to do like 30 like laps like back and forth across the mat, like pulling ourselves on our arms and our stomachs.

“And we like burned all the skin off of our elbows, and like we were all bleeding through our gi[s]. I remember one of my friends like threw up at the end of the day. We like trained for like six hours.

“And, you know, we’re 12 year olds.”

She said her childhood training was tougher than what MMA fighters endure today.

She said: “I’ve been doing that kind of gnarly stuff for so long that it’s like I feel so pampered and spoiled now that I’m a professional athlete.”

446px-Ronda_Rousey_retouchWhen asked if she’s worried that her opponent may be training harder than her, she replied: “I’ve been getting those feelings ever since I was a little kid. My mom told me the story, I was like 15 years old and like I already trained like three times that day. And it was like almost and I was walking out the door to go running.

“And my mom stopped me and she was like what are you doing? You already trained three times today. And I was like I just wanted to know that there was no other girl in the world that trained harder than me that day. And I went out and I went running. I had a fourth workout that day.

“And that’s something that I always had. It’s like an innate thing. And that’s where a lot of my confidence comes from is that I know that I train harder than any of these girls. And I train more efficiently and I train smarter. And there’s nothing that they could do to possibly try and catch up.

“If anything with every fight they fall farther and farther behind. And their own insecurity of trying to keep up with me actually ends up with them being over trained. Because if they tried to train as much as I do and as hard as I do, they will end up being over trained.

“And so it’s actually better for me for them to have that insecurity in their mind and try to push themselves farther than their body will allow because my body is just capable of taking more.”

She said her Judo background means she has had more fights than Bethe can possibly imagine. She said: “Well I started Judo when I was 10. And my first tournament was on my 11th birthday, so I usually count it from there. And my main inspiration was my mother. She was the first American to ever win the world championships in judo. And it’s really easy to think that you’re capable of anything when you have a world champion walking through your living room, you know?

“Excellence was expected in my family always. And me and all my sisters, we were told you could do whatever in the world it is you want to do. But you just, you have, you know, you’ve got to be the best in the world at it because that’s what you’re capable of.

“And my confidence really just came from years and years and years of hard work. And I mean I would be, you know 11, 12 years old and I would fight in two different tournaments in a weekend in three divisions in, you know, both tournaments. And then so that’s six divisions in a tournament and probably four matches in each, you know? And that’s just – every weekend or every other weekend when I was a kid.

“So I’ve had thousands and thousands and thousands of matches and so much more competition experience that these girls could ever have. I mean how many matches does Bethe really have – under ten in her whole life in any sport? I mean I’ve had thousands and thousands and thousands of matches. I’ve had times where I’ve been planted on my face and my entire body scorpioned over but I had to not touch my toe to the ground because that way it would result in a score. And
then I’d have to jump up and find a way to win anyway.

“I’ve had fights where I’ve had my elbow dislocated and had to pop it back in place and ended up throwing the other person in the last few seconds with the arm that was just dislocated because it just had to happen. I mean I’ve been in every single situation that you possibly could think of.

“I’ve been as sick as possible and still come out and won anyway. I’ve had fights where I had such a terrible weight cut that someone jumped on top of me and I ended up throwing up in the middle of the match where I had to wipe it up with my own arm like under me. If the referees didn’t see it and I wouldn’t get disqualified. And I still came up and smelling of vomit, I f***ing won anyway.

“I mean I’ve had so many thousands of experiences that this girl could never possibly have between when she decided that MMA was a cool idea until now. And she’ll never catch up. And that’s what confidence comes from. It comes from overcoming, and I’ve overcome so much more than any of these girls possibly ever could.”

She laid out her plan: “Here’s pretty much the plan. I’m going to beat up Bethe. Then I’m going to take a little, like a couple of weeks to rest. And then I’m going to go beat up Miesha. And then I’m going to go and I don’t know, like to Thailand or wherever we decide to film. I’m going to prep for like a month and start filming for like, you know, eight to ten weeks, and then go beat up the next chick. That’s pretty much my plan.”

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